Category Archive : Business

20190123 Analia Valdemoros poses for a picture with the Salt Lake City Council on Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2019. The City Council unanimously voted to chose Valdemoros out of 20 candidates vying to replace now state Sen. Derek Kitchen.

Analia Valdemoros poses for a picture with the Salt Lake City Council on Tuesday, Jan. 22, 2019. The City Council unanimously voted to chose Valdemoros out of 20 candidates vying to replace now state Sen. Derek Kitchen. | Katie McKellar

SALT LAKE CITY — Susan Madsen said she was taken aback by what her research team discovered in its third and final quantitative look at leadership in Utah’s public sector.

29.1%.

That’s the proportion of women who hold municipal leadership positions in the Beehive State — a significantly lower percentage than female leaders in Utah’s state and county governments, which are both around 40%.

Madsen is the founder and director of the Utah Women and Leadership Project, which released its study on municipal leadership in Utah on Tuesday. The paper is meant to inform Utahns about gender disparity in their government and hopefully work to change the status quo.

“I think Dr. Madsen realizes that, first of all, to really address a problem you have to identify it and quantify it,” said Logan Mayor Holly Daines. “So her studies, I think, have really done an excellent job at gathering data to show us exactly where we are, and then we can take a look and say, ‘OK, we need to make some progress here.’”

“I think it will improve. There’s no question about it. Because we are aware, and we’re working on it, and the numbers will get better.”

7 analyses of the data

The researchers first broke the data down by leadership level, classifying jobs into four categories: top, executive, senior and front line. Generally, researchers expect to see higher percentages of women in front-line positions and lower percentages in more senior roles. The phenomena is called the “leaky leadership pipeline.”

However, the Utah Women and Leadership Project found “almost the opposite is …read more

Source:: Deseret News – Business News

      

The town of Hideout wants to annex hundreds of acres from Summit County and Wasatch County, including land on both sides of state Route 248, near the Black Rock Ridge community, in Wasatch County on Monday, July 20, 2020.

The town of Hideout wants to annex hundreds of acres from Summit County and Wasatch County, including land on both sides of state Route 248, near the Black Rock Ridge community, in Wasatch County on Monday, July 20, 2020. | Kristin Murphy, Deseret News

Developer’s plan includes chairlift or gondola to top of Richardson Peak

HIDEOUT, Wasatch County — Even though the legal battle over Hideout’s controversial annexation proposal to put commercial development east of Park City is far from over, Hideout town officials are plowing ahead.

The question of whether the town will be able to annex hundreds of acres despite legal protests from Park City and Summit County is still tangled in court, but Hideout leaders are already getting in the weeds of what the development will entail.

One highlight of the proposal that has raised even some Town Council members’ eyebrows: a chairlift or a gondola to take mountain bikers and hikers to the top of Richardson Peak — which developer Nate Brockbank said would be paid for with commercial and residential homeowner association fees.

The Hideout Town Council on Thursday and the Hideout Planning Commission last month reviewed a new, scaled down development proposal Brockbank submitted to the town, despite several lawsuits from Park City and Summit County seeking to stop the annexation from ever happening.

A judge last month blocked Hideout’s initial attempt to annex about 655 acres, but didn’t block Hideout from starting a new annexation process under a Utah law that paved a legal pathway for the proposal. So Hideout restarted that process with a new resolution of intent to annex — but the clock is ticking.

After the Deseret News uncovered how the legislation that allowed Hideout’s annexation without permission from any of the surrounding counties was misrepresented on …read more

Source:: Deseret News – Business News