Category Archive : Business

Sonic (Ben Schwartz) in SONIC THE HEDGEHOG from Paramount Pictures and Sega. Photo Credit: Courtesy Paramount Pictures and Sega of America.

Sonic (Ben Schwartz) in SONIC THE HEDGEHOG from Paramount Pictures and Sega. Photo Credit: Courtesy Paramount Pictures and Sega of America. | Paramount Pictures

A quick look at 2020 numbers show life hasn’t moved at all since the pandemic started

The 2020 box office numbers are striking. One quick look at the list shows a weird assortment of movies that came out before the pandemic and ones that were hits in 2019 — since there were so few movies released before the pandemic hit.

Only two films released in the pandemic era — “Tenet” and “The New Mutants” — made the list, and they’re not even within the top five for the United States.

Here’s a rundown of the films. These are the top 10 grossing films for the 2020 U.S. box office, courtesy of Box Office Mojo.

“Bad Boys for Life” — $206 million
“Sonic the Hedgehog” — $146 million
“Birds of Prey: And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn” — $84 million
“Dolittle” — $77 million
“The Invisible Man” — $64 million
“The Call of the Wild” — $62 million
“Onward” — $61 million
“Tenet” — $50 million
“Fantasy Island” — $27 million
“The New Mutants” — $22 million

Many of the same films make the list when you look at total worldwide numbers. “Tenet” climbs to the third spot due to its international numbers, and “Sonic” drops down to No. 4 on the list.

A look at this list is a glimpse into a world long gone by. These are films that were hyped for months ahead of the pandemic, ones we considered seeing when we weren’t spooked about heading to the movies.

“Onward” — seventh on the list — was the last film I saw in theaters. In fact, I watched it as a part of the Pixar movie marathon, which aired a …read more

Source:: Deseret News – Business News

      

Construction continues on the Utah Department of Transportation’s 5600 West bridge project over the Union Pacific Railroad crossing near 800 South in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020. Officials say the project will eliminate delays and congestion caused by trains. The project is also widening 5600 West from state Route 201 to I-80 to two lanes in each direction with a center turn lane.

Construction continues on the Utah Department of Transportation’s 5600 West bridge project over the Union Pacific Railroad crossing near 800 South in Salt Lake City on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020. Officials say the project will eliminate delays and congestion caused by trains. The project is also widening 5600 West from state Route 201 to I-80 to two lanes in each direction with a center turn lane. | Steve Griffin, Deseret News

SALT LAKE CITY — Drivers on Salt Lake City’s far west side should have a better travel experience with the addition of a new railway bridge aimed at reducing long train delays and traffic backups at a highly traveled intersection.

The Utah Department of Transportation is installing a new bridge over the Union Pacific Railroad tracks near the intersection of 5600 West and 800 South. Construction crews Monday started placing support beams for the new overpass that will continue throughout the week, officials said.

UDOT’s 5600 West improvement project includes the new bridge over the rail crossing at 800 South that is meant to eliminate delays and congestion caused by trains, explained UDOT spokesman John Gleason.

“Right now, that’s a major frustration for people that have to drive through there on a daily basis because they can be stuck at the train tracks for 45 minutes to an hour,” he said.

The $83 million project is also expanding 5600 West between state Route 201 and I-80 to five lanes — two in each direction with a center turn lane — as well as improving numerous other nearby intersections and reconfiguring the interchange at I-80 as a diverging diamond interchange, he added. The project is scheduled for completion in fall 2021.

“We want to improve not only traffic flow by widening the (road), but also improve the quality of life for people to have …read more

Source:: Deseret News – Business News

      

Rep. Susan Pulsipher, R-South Jordan, listens to Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, talk about anti-vaping efforts during a roundtable discussion at Primary Children’s Hospital in Salt Lake City on Thursday, Oct. 10, 2019.

Rep. Susan Pulsipher, R-South Jordan, listens to Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, talk about anti-vaping efforts during a roundtable discussion at Primary Children’s Hospital in Salt Lake City on Thursday, Oct. 10, 2019. | Kristin Murphy, Deseret News

SALT LAKE CITY — Should sellers of smartphones and computers be required to install software to block access to legal but explicit internet content and have those programs switched on when the devices are sold to Utah customers?

A proposal from Rep. Susan Pulsipher, R-South Jordan, looking to do just that ran into a buzz saw of dissent at an interim committee hearing Tuesday, and the idea was bounced without a vote.

Pulsipher said the goal of her effort was to create another wall of defense to help protect children from “the damaging impact of pornography” and “empower parents and legal guardians to limit a minor’s exposure to such online harmful material.”

In a presentation to the Business and Labor Interim Committee, Pulsipher said the “government has a compelling interest in protecting minors from harmful sexually explicit material generally referred to as pornography” and that the U.S. Supreme Court has “held that sexually explicit material deemed ‘harmful to minors’ can be proscribed for minors so long as adults retain reasonable access to such material.”

Pulsipher said she believes that compelling manufacturers and distributors of internet-connected electronic devices to build in and switch on content filters was a better method of protecting minors than “other legislative efforts.”

But committee members balked at Pulsipher’s approach, noting that it would be extremely difficult to identify which entity in the consumer electronics supply chain should be held liable for ensuring that software was activated.

Sen. Curt Bramble, R-Provo, pointed out that Pulsipher’s proposal failed to identify whether the responsible party was the manufacturer, the company that distributed the product, or the …read more

Source:: Deseret News – Business News

      

In this Oct. 2, 2006 file photo, a Google receptionist works at the front desk in the company’s office in New York. Australia announced a police investigation Sunday, June 6, 2010 into whether Google illegally collected private information from wireless networks, becoming at least the second country to probe the Internet giant’s “Street View” mapping service. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

In this file photo, a Google receptionist works at the front desk in the company’s office in New York. | Mark Lennihan, Associated Press

Some say action smacks of politics, but Sen. Mike Lee lauds move as Utah’s A.G. hints at separate multistate action

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah did not appear as one of the co-plaintiffs in a Justice Department filing Tuesday of an antitrust lawsuit against online search giant Google, but the state may be readying its own separate action targeting the company.

The filing in federal court in Washington, D.C., which alleges Google misused its market dominance in online search and advertising, marks the most significant U.S. legal action taken against a Big Tech firm since the landmark United States vs. Microsoft case in the early 2000s.

The Utah Attorney General’s Office has been working with a team of fellow attorneys general from around the country for over a year looking at potential misconduct by big U.S. tech firms. Now, 11 states have joined the U.S. Department of Justice in their filing while Utah — along with Arizona, Colorado, Iowa, Nebraska, New York and North Carolina — are maintaining their own legal faction.

Utah’s multistate group said it is close to concluding its own investigation into Google’s practices and, should it choose to take legal action, will be looking to consolidate efforts with the Justice Department. If that happens, the broad coalition would mirror the collaborative effort that targeted Microsoft and its strategies to dominate the web browser market some 20 years ago.

“Over the last year, both the DOJ and state attorneys general have conducted separate but parallel investigations into Google’s anti-competitive market behavior,” a statement from the group says. “We appreciate the strong bipartisan cooperation among the states and the good working relationship with the DOJ on these …read more

Source:: Deseret News – Business News

      

Adobe Stock

PROVO — A supervisor at a Provo business has been charged with engaging in illegal sexual conduct with a teenager while at work.

Justin Thomas Nielson, 35, of Springville, was charged Monday in 4th District Court with unlawful sexual conduct with a 16-year-old, a third-degree felony; and unlawful sexual conduct with a minor, a class A misdemeanor.

A 16-year-old boy told police that on Sept. 25 while working at an undisclosed business in Provo, Neilson “took him into a back room of the business away from cameras,” according to charging documents, and inappropriately touched the boy.

“(Neilson) is the supervisor of the victim and has processed his employee application and would be aware of the victim’s age. However, (he) denied knowing the victim was underage,” according to charging documents.

…read more

Source:: Deseret News – Business News

      

Adobe Stock

PROVO — A supervisor at a Provo business has been charged with engaging in illegal sexual conduct with a teenager while at work.

Justin Thomas Nielson, 35, of Springville, was charged Monday in 4th District Court with unlawful sexual conduct with a 16-year-old, a third-degree felony; and unlawful sexual conduct with a minor, a class A misdemeanor.

A 16-year-old boy told police that on Sept. 25 while working at an undisclosed business in Provo, Neilson “took him into a back room of the business away from cameras,” according to charging documents, and inappropriately touched the boy.

“(Neilson) is the supervisor of the victim and has processed his employee application and would be aware of the victim’s age. However, (he) denied knowing the victim was underage,” according to charging documents.

…read more

Source:: Deseret News – Business News

      

A new wildfire spread rapidly in Boulder County, Colorado, over the weekend, prompting the evacuations of at least 3,000 people. The CalWood Fire began burning Saturday about 50 miles southeast of the Cameron Peak Fire, the largest in state history. “It just exploded,” Mike Wagner, division chief with the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office, said of the CalWood fire. “We do believe multiple homes were probably lost. It’s still too dynamic to get in and begin to assess.”

The Cameron Peak Fire started in mid-August, and has burned more than 317 square miles. The cause of the new fire was not immediately determined, although investigators said there had been no lightning strikes or other weather events that could have started the CalWood Fire. The area has had high winds and “critically dry” conditions for weeks, fire officials said.

…read more

Source:: The Week – Business

      

The Biden campaign debuted a political ad during Sunday’s Steelers-Browns game, centered around the Blind Pig, a music club in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The thrust of the ad is that President Trump’s COVID-19 response, both economic and in terms of public health, has decimated the live music business. But the commercial is perhaps most notable for the song that kicks in at about the 40-second mark, “Sabotage” by the Beastie Boys. This is, Variety reports, the first time the band has licensed any of its music for an advertisement.

The Beastie Boys agreed to using “Sabotage” in the ad “because of the importance of the election,” the Biden campaign tells Variety. The band has allowed the song to be used in a trailer for “Star Trek” and in the video game “Destine 2,” but the late Adam Yauch said in his will that no music he was involved in creating should be used for product advertising, and the Beastie Boys have sued brands for using their songs, Variety reports.

“A lot of restaurants and bars that have been mainstays for years will not make it through this,” Blind Pig co-owner Joe Malcoun says in the ad. “This is Donald Trump’s economy: There is no plan and you don’t know how to go forward.” The economy is, probably not coincidentally, Trump’s strongest issue in opinion polling.

Still, Joe Biden isn’t the only top presidential candidate with support from legendary bands. Mike Love and his touring Beach Boys band played at a Trump fundraiser in Newport Beach, California, on Sunday (though founding Beach Boys members Brian Wilson and Al Jardine made clear they had nothing to do with Love’s participation in a Trump event).

…read more

Source:: The Week – Business