Snowflake Mountain Isn’t Just Pandering to Viewers on the Right. It’s Also Hinting at Where Netflix May Be Headed

Snowflake Mountain Season 1
Pete Dadds‘Snowflake Mountain’ cast members Deandra, left, and Rae

The show’s stated values are conservative in a relatively benign sense. Joel Graves and Matt Tate, the survivalists who also serve as the de facto hosts and Greek chorus, offer a dim view of that perennial scapegoat: Kids Today. “There’s a heap of young people who can’t even unload a dishwasher, let alone hold down a job,” they lament in an introductory montage, over shots of cast members applying makeup, lounging on couches, and just generally whining. What these

Snowflake Mountain is, depending on your age, location, and political sympathies, either pandering to you or trolling you. Its bias is right there in the first word of the title, a favorite pejorative of conservatives who perceive those to their left, particularly young people, as overly sensitive. And its premise seems tailor-made to support the worldview of the people most likely to use snowflake as an insult. Ten young adults introduced as lazy, selfish, and dependent on their parents are bamboozled into a stint at wilderness camp (they think they’re en route to a luxe villa), where a pair of military vets turned survival experts are charged with whipping them into shape.
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Getting upset about a show this silly would just be playing into the hands of its executive producers, reality-TV pros Cal Turner (The Apprentice UK, Undercover Boss) and Jo Harcourt-Smith (The Circle). Yet it’s worthwhile to understand what Snowflake Mountain is doing, both on its surface and below—not just because it so transparently capitalizes on our ever-intensifying culture wars, but also because that approach says a lot about where Netflix might be headed, midway through an uncharacteristically bad year for the service.

Pete Dadds‘Snowflake Mountain’ cast members Deandra, left, and Rae

The show’s stated values are conservative in a relatively benign sense. Joel Graves and Matt Tate, the survivalists who also serve as the de facto hosts and Greek chorus, offer a dim view of that perennial scapegoat: Kids Today. “There’s a heap of young people who can’t even unload a dishwasher, let alone hold down a job,” they lament in an introductory montage, over shots of cast members applying makeup, lounging on couches, and just generally whining. What these Gen Z slackers supposedly need to become independent is not job training, the cancellation …read more

Source:: Time – Entertainment

      

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